Accueil du site > Actualités > International ArBoCo workshop

International ArBoCo workshop

”Towards a better understanding and preservation of archaeological and historical bone material”

“Vers une meilleure compréhension et préservation des matériaux osseux archéologiques et historiques”

Amphithéâtre B. Palissy, Laboratoire du C2RMF, Palais du Louvre, Paris

December, 1st – 3rd 2010 / 1er au 3 décembre 2010

Coordinator / Coordinatrice : Ina Reiche (C2RMF – UMR 171 CNRS)

Organising committee / Comité d’organisation

  • Katharina Müller, Rémi Brageu (C2RMF – UMR 171 CNRS)
  • Matthieu Lebon, Carole Vercoutère, Antoine Zazzo (MNHN - UMR 7194/7209 CNRS)
  • Eva-Maria Geigl (IJM - UMR 7592 CNRS)
  • Gilles Chaumat (ArcNucléart)
  • Aurélien Gourrier (LPS/ESRF - UMR 8502 CNRS)
  • Ludovic Bellot-Gurlet (LADIR - UMR 7075 CNRS UPMC)
  • Jean-Marc Pétillon (TRACES - UMR 5608 CNRS)
  • Marianne Christensen (Univ. Paris I, Institut d’Art et d’Archéologie)

Inscription is closed.

A program of the workshop is available :

PDF - 104.9 ko

version Française

Scope and Topics

Identification and differentiation of bone materials

In the field of archaeology and history, it is important, and in some cases, very difficult to identify and differentiate between ancient bone materials. The basis for the discrimination between bone remains and artefacts generally lies in very diverse observations obtained, e.g., from osteology, biochemistry, geology and structural physics. This issue therefore requires a highly interdisciplinary approach. The aim of this session is to evaluate the potential of chemical, structural and morphological markers of ancient bone, ivory and antler materials at different scales determined from a broad field of research ranging from archaeozoology to biogeochemistry. We would like to include in the session interdisciplinary studies on different archaeological bone materials but also on museum objects without any chronological or spatial restrictions.

From bone materials to the artefacts : manufacturing traces, use weare & mechanical properties

Archaeological bone, ivory and antler belong to the first materials that have been transformed by man. There are, on one hand, changes induced by heating or burning and, on the other hand, transformations obtained by mechanical means. This session is dedicated to retrace the manufacturing sequence and anthropic modifications of bone material into tools or symbolic objects or to identify characteristic use weares of special manufacturing techniques. We also want to emphasize the relationship between mechanical properties and raw material choices corresponding to different cultural traditions. Another important point to consider is the differentiation of use weare and traces due to manufacturing, from diagenetic and taphonomic changes.

Diagenetic alterations and taphonomic processes

Ancient bone materials are modified due to biogeochemical alteration and taphonomic processes. As biomaterials they register a wealth of important information on past ways of life in their chemical and isotopic composition as well as in their structure. Therefore, it is important to evaluate very precisely the informative potential of the material on past life styles by studying the underlying biogeochemical alteration processes and the taphonomic changes. In this session we want to highlight studies aiming at a better understanding of diagenetic and taphonomic processes of bone, ivory and antler material in different environments.

Conservation

Bone materials take an important place among prehistoric objects. It is also important to note that a large quantity of works of art in our museums is at least partly made of bone, ivory or antler. They were used at least form prehistoric times to the 18th century to manufacture, among others, sculptures and book covers. However, no systematic conservation procedure for ancient bone material is available for curators. In addition, osseous objects are often integrated in complex assemblages with other materials or have been surface-treated. To consolidate fragile bone structures, conservation treatments have often been applied without any systematic control and testing of interaction with the different materials. The treatment is generally achieved with a polymer to reinforce the bone structure. However, the consolidation agent can have negative effects on the remaining bone material. It can cause additional alteration processes linked with the degradation of the consolidation agent. To our knowledge, there is no conservation method available today which is adapted to the degree of preservation and to the archaeological conservation purpose (museum, excavation field, DNA analysis…) and which fully respects the preservation criteria required in the archaeological and museum context. The aim of this session is to present the state of the art of the knowledge, the methods and the conservation treatments that have been recently developed for these needs.

Methods and case studies

As complex nano-biomaterial, bone materials represent a real analytical challenge. Moreover, ancient bone materials are even more complex due to anthropic, diagenetic and taphonomic changes. It is therefore important to develop and apply new methods for ancient bone characterisation, e.g. for instance by being inspired by research in the biomedical field. This theme is dedicated to methodological developments of bone investigations in different fields such as osteology, biochemistry, geology and structural physics. It is also intended to have time for discussion of different archaeological and museum case studies.

Invited Speakers

  • Steven Weiner, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
  • Randall White, New York University, USA

Proceedings

Proceedings of the workshop will be published in the peer-reviewed journal ArchéoSciences, available in a printed version and online : http://archeosciences.revues.org/ Articles can be written in English or French. Manuscripts should be submitted to the organisers before December, 31st 2010.

Venue

The workshop will be held at the lecture hall Bernard Palissy at the Laboratory of the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF-UMR 171 CNRS) situated at the Louvre Museum in the city centre of Paris. The laboratory administrated by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication (MCC) and the CNRS, has several missions : to perform research, restoration, preventive conservation and documentation for and with the collections of French museums.

Address

Amphithéâtre Bernard Palissy C2RMF, Palais du Louvre –Porte des Lions, 14 quai F. Mitterrand, 75001 Paris, France

Detailed directions can be found at the website of the C2RMF. ]

Notification of acceptance

October, 15th 2010

Deadline for registration for the workshop : November, 1st 2010

Number of participants is limited to 80 persons.

Language of the scientific contributions : English & French

Participation is free of charge

Authors are encouraged to submit abstracts for talks and poster presentations related to the given topics. Abstracts should be submitted as MS word- or pdf-files via email to : ArBoCo.workshop@gmail.com Please prepare your abstracts according to the instructions below.

Contact address

  • Ina Reiche
  • LC2RMF – UMR 171 CNRS
  • Palais du Louvre
  • 75001 Paris, France
  • (+33)-1-40205651
  • Email : ArBoCo.workshop@gmail.com
Preliminary program
Registration_form_template
PDF Form
PDF - 135.8 ko
Word Form
Word - 105.5 ko
Divers documents
Poster
PDF - 660.8 ko
Flyer
PDF - 412.2 ko

Version Française

L’inscription est close.

Le programme est disponible ici :

PDF - 104.9 ko

Buts et thèmes

Identification et différentiation des matériaux osseux

Dans les domaines de l’archéologie et de l’histoire, il est important, et dans certains cas difficile, d’identifier et de différencier les matériaux osseux anciens. Ces distinctions sont, en général, fondées sur l’observation des objets osseux. Elles sont notamment basée sur des aspects d’ostéologie, de biochimie, de géologie ou encore de physique structurale. Cette problématique nécessite donc la mise en place d’une approche fortement interdisciplinaire. Le but de cette session est d’évaluer le potentiel des marqueurs chimiques, structuraux et morphologiques spécifiques des matériaux tels que l’os, l’ivoire ou le bois de cervidé ; marqueurs provenant donc d’un large champ de recherche, depuis l’archéozoologie jusqu’à la bio-géo-chimie. Nous souhaitons inclure dans cette session des études interdisciplinaires portant sur différents matériaux archéologiques osseux, mais aussi sur des objets de musées, sans aucune restriction chronologique ou géographique

Des matériaux osseux aux artefacts : traces de fabrication, traces d’utilisation et propriétés mécaniques

L’os, l’ivoire et le bois de cervidé archéologiques font partie des premiers matériaux qui ont été transformés par l’Homme. On peut distinguer d’une part les changements induits par la chauffe, et, d’autre part, les transformations obtenues par action mécanique. Cette session vise à retracer les différentes étapes des modifications anthropiques des matériaux osseux et de leur transformation en outils ou en objets symboliques, ou encore d’identifier les traces d’utilisation caractéristiques de certaines techniques de fabrication. Nous souhaitons également mettre l’accent sur les relations entre les propriétés mécaniques et les matières premières choisies dans le cadre de différentes traditions culturelles. Une autre point important à considérer est la distinction entre les traces de fabrication ou d’utilisation et celles induites par des processus taphonomiques ou diagénétiques.

Altérations diagénétiques et processus taphonomiques

Les matériaux osseux anciens sont modifiés par les altérations bio-géo-chimiques et les processus taphonomiques. En tant que biomatériaux, ils contiennent de nombreuses informations sur les comportements du passé, tant dans leur composition chimique et isotopique que dans leur structure. Il est par conséquent important d’évaluer très précisément le potentiel informatif de ces matériaux pour restituer les modes de vie du passé en étudiant les processus d’altération biogéochimiques et les changements taphonomiques les ayant affectés. Dans cette session, nous souhaitons mettre l’accent sur les études visant à mieux comprendre les processus taphonomiques et diagénétiques intervenant sur l’os, l’ivoire et le bois de cervidé dans différents types d’environnements.

Conservation

Les matériaux osseux occupent une place importante parmi les objets archéologiques. Il est aussi important de noter qu’une grande quantité des œuvres d’art de nos musées est au moins en partie constituée d’os, d’ivoire ou de bois de cervidé. Ces matériaux ont été utilisés de la Préhistoire au Moyen Âge pour confectionner, entre autres, des sculptures et des couvertures de livres. Cependant, aucune procédure de conservation systématique n’est disponible pour les restaurateurs. Par ailleurs, les matériaux osseux sont souvent intégrés avec d’autres matériaux au sein d’assemblages complexes ou ont subi des traitements de surface. Pour consolider les structures osseuses fragiles, les traitements de conservation ont souvent été appliqués sans aucun contrôle ou test de leur interaction avec différentes matériaux. Ces traitements impliquent généralement l’usage de polymères pour renforcer la structure osseuse. Cependant, ces agents de consolidation peuvent avoir des effets négatifs sur les matériaux osseux résiduels, en causant notamment des dommages additionnels liés à la dégradation des agents consolidants eux-mêmes. A notre connaissance, il n’existe pas de méthode de conservation disponible actuellement qui soit adaptée à l’état de préservation des matériaux et au but de la conservation archéologique (musées, chantiers archéologiques, analyses ADN…) tout en respectant complètement les critères de conservation requis dans un contexte archéologique et muséal. Le but de cette session est de présenter un état de l’art des connaissances, des méthodes et des traitements de conservation qui ont été récemment développés afin de répondre à cette nécessité.

Méthodes et études de cas

En tant que biomateriaux nano-structurés complexes, l’étude des matériaux osseux représente un réel défi analytique. De plus, les matériaux osseux anciens sont d’autant plus complexes du fait des modifications anthropiques et des changements diagénétiques et taphonomiques. Il est donc particulièrement important de développer et d’appliquer de nouvelles méthodes pour la caractérisation de ces matériaux, par exemple en s’inspirant des recherches menées dans le domaine biomédical. Cette session est dédiée aux développements méthodologiques des études dans différents champs disciplinaires tels que l’ostéologie, la biochimie, la géologie et la physique structurale. Il sera également l’occasion de discuter de différents cas d’étude archéologiques et muséaux.

Lieu

Le workshop se tiendra dans l’amphitéatre Bernard Palissy au laboratoire du centre de recherche et de restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF-UMR 171 CNRS) situé au Musée du Louvre au centre de Paris. Ce laboratoire, administré par les ministères français de la culture et le CNRS, est dédié à plusieurs missions : la recherche, la restauration, la conservation préventive et la documentation, pour et avec les collections des Musées Français.

Adresse :

Amphithéâtre Bernard Palissy C2RMF, Palais du Louvre –Porte des Lions, 14 quai F. Mitterrand, 75001 Paris, France

Des détails complémentaires peuvent êtres trouvés sur le site internet du C2RMF www.c2rmf.fr.

Notification des acceptations : 15 octobre 2010

Date limite d’inscription au workshop : 1er novembre 2010

Le nombre de participant est limité à 80 personnes. Les communications scientifiques pourront se faire en anglais et en français. La participation est gratuite.

Les auteurs sont encouragés à soumettre leur résumé pour les communications orales ou les posters en fonction des thématiques des différentes sessions. Les résumés sont à soumettre au format MS Word ou Pdf à l’adresse email suivante : ArBoCo.workshop@gmail.com Nous vous prions de préparer votre résumé en utilisant les instructions et le modèle disponible sur le site internet du workshop.

  • Ina Reiche
  • LC2RMF – UMR 171 CNRS
  • Palais du Louvre
  • 75001 Paris, France
  • (+33)-1-40205651
  • Email : ArBoCo.workshop@gmail.com

Actes du workshop

Les actes du workshop seront publiés dans la revue à comité de lecture ArchéoSciences, disponible en version papier et à l’adresse suivante http://archeosciences.revues.org/ Les manuscrits devront être soumis avant le 31 décembre 2010 pour une publication prévue à la fin de l’année 2011. Les manuscrits devront êtres soumis en anglais ou en français en suivant le guide disponible sur le site de la revue archéoscience : http://archeosciences.revues.org/index1062.html

Programme préliminaire
Fiches d’inscriptions
PDF Form
PDF - 135.8 ko
Word Form
Word - 105.5 ko
Divers documents
Poster
PDF - 660.8 ko
Flyer
PDF - 468 ko